Monday, May 20, 2013

THE DARKER SIDE OF MOTHER NATURE

Since this blog serves as my electronic journal of sorts, I am recording the first major storm of the season here. Just as my husband and I sat down last evening to enjoy a dinner of sautéed morel mushrooms, we heard the town's tornado sirens blare. In a matter of minutes, everything turned dark outside and the sky had a slight greenish cast to it. The phone rang and it was my dad calling to tell us to take shelter in the basement as a tornado had been spotted on the southern edge of town. So we quickly gathered the cats and put them in the basement. Dime-size hail started pelting against our 6-foot tall windows—a sickening sound as I thought how much it would cost to replace them. I know that's what insurance is for, but it was still sickening. And then I realized if the hail were to break the windows, all my violets, which were sitting next to them, would be lost. So I started gathering all of my violets and brought them into an interior room. Before I could finish gathering them all, the storm had passed as quickly as it arrived. Afterward, we surveyed the damage. An inch-thick layer of hail (some as large as a quarter in diameter) covered my arbor garden and most all the plants were bedraggled. The plants in the below photo are tansy, which look like delightful miniature ferns—when they haven't been tormented by an onslaught of hail.




In the backyard, I noticed one of the vintage metal garden chairs that my friend Linda had given me had been tossed about. We also had several broken tree limbs but not as bad as some. Our poor neighbor had a limb that fell on his garage. Even the door to our root cellar had been tossed aside, and our neighbor's shed door was ripped off.


I was thankful the storm had passed without anyone getting harmed. When we get these kinds of monster storms, I can't help but wonder if we'll have a home after they're done, but then I remember that our old home has stood for more than 125 years and I'm sure it's weathered some horrific storms in its long history. Thankfully, it's still standing, and I hope it will for many more years to come. Needless to say, I did not get to enjoy my morels last night but we'll try again tonight! More are soaking in water in preparation for our feast as I write this!

9 comments:

  1. Thank goodness you were safe and no real damage done but those hailstones look enormous. Enjoy your mushrooms.

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  2. Glad to hear you are safe and not too much damage Kimber.

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  3. How frightening for you! Glad the damage isn't too bad.

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  4. Very glad your safe and no real damage to speak of.

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  5. So glad to hear that you are safe and with minimal damage .

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  6. I thought of you and your old house when I heard tornadoes touched down near Des Moines. Glad you only suffered little damage and are safe!

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  7. So glad you and your violets are safe. Those storms can cause so much damage, as witnessed in Oklahoma this week.

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  8. Glad you are safe. We have had some ugly weather here too but thankfully it has been nothing like Oklahoma.

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  9. We had a terrible hail storm at our house a couple of years ago. When I started to hear glass windows breaking, I yelled for my son to get downstairs - and who was the first one to get to the basement? Our retriever/mix dog Lucy. I've never seen her move that fast - like she understood my words!

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